Posted by: Upāsaka | 05/08/2018

Breathing in Sickness

This morning there was an older gentleman who was having periodic coughing fits in the train. Worst of all, he neglected to cover his mouth at all. Naturally, as a “modern, educated” man I was both aghast and tempted to ask him to cover his mouth. But, then it struck me: this is a man who is suffering. As Lord Buddha asserts, sickness is suffering and anyone who’s tried to stifle a cough or make it through the day with a cold knows that.

So, I breathed it in figuratively and, I suppose, literally. I made the aspiration that he be free from sickness and that I may take in the germs and storage anyone else the sickness as well. I have done this once before and both times it has completely changed my view of the situation.

Instead of clamping down and trying to shield myself from his cold while muttering silent recriminations, I opened to his suffering and tried to connect to him and everyone else on the crowded train.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Categories

*luz de atención constante*

En este blog encontrarás una cuidada selección de traducciones en español sobre el camino interior.

Euthyphroria

Reflections on Ancient Literature and Practical Humanism

How to Be a Stoic

an evolving guide to practical Stoicism for the 21st century

How to Think Like a Roman Emperor

Courses and Articles about Philosophy as a Way of Life

Modern Stoicism

Home of Stoicon and Stoic Week