Posted by: Upāsaka Subhavi | 03/05/2021

Dhammapada Memorization: Verse 17

17. The evil-doer suffers here and hereafter; he suffers in both the worlds. The thought, “Evil have I done,” torments him, and he suffers even more when gone to realms of woe.

Please find the audio recording of this verse below. Please take the time to recite the following three times before reading the words of Lord Buddha:

Namo Tassa Bhagavato Arahato Sammā Sambudhassa (3 times).

Homage to the blessed One, the Perfected One, the Fully Awakened One (3 times).

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1qbWH5SCXE2ypMFqCBhz34WEkPEGjEl2b/view?usp=sharing

Be sure to repeat the verse, with the verse number at least ten times out loud. It helps if you can do this multiple times a day and use as many different techniques (writing, repetition, listening) as possible.

The Illustrated Dhammapada, Treasury of Truth, gives the following context and explanation for this verse of the Dhammapada:

Verse 17. Evil Action Leads to Torment

Here one burns, one burns hereafter,
in both ways does the evil-doer burn;
evil I’ve done, remorsefully one burns,
and more one burns passed to realms of woe.

Explanation: Those who do evil, those given to wrong doings, are tortured in mind both here and hereafter. Being born in a state of woe after death the doer of evil keeps on torturing himself more with the thought “I have done evil deeds. “

Posted by: Upāsaka Subhavi | 03/04/2021

Dhammapada Memorization: Verse 16

16. The doer of good rejoices here and hereafter; he rejoices in both the worlds. He rejoices and exults, recollecting his own pure deeds.

Please find the audio recording of this verse below. Please take the time to recite the following three times before reading the words of Lord Buddha:

Namo Tassa Bhagavato Arahato Sammā Sambudhassa (3 times).

Homage to the blessed One, the Perfected One, the Fully Awakened One (3 times).

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1qbWH5SCXE2ypMFqCBhz34WEkPEGjEl2b/view?usp=sharing

Be sure to repeat the verse, with the verse number at least ten times out loud. It helps if you can do this multiple times a day and use as many different techniques (writing, repetition, listening) as possible.

The Illustrated Dhammapada, Treasury of Truth, gives the following context and explanation for this verse of the Dhammapada:

Verse 16. Good Deeds Bring Happiness

Here one joys, one joys hereafter,
in both ways does the merit-maker joy;
one joys and one rejoices,
one’s own pure kammas seeing.

Explanation: A wise person does good deeds. Having done those good deeds he rejoices here in this world. He rejoices in the life after as well. Seeing the purity of his virtuous actions, he rejoices. He is thoroughly joyous seeing the goodness of his deeds.

Posted by: Upāsaka Subhavi | 03/03/2021

Dhammapada Memorization: Verse 15

15. The evil-doer grieves here and hereafter; he grieves in both the worlds. He laments and is afflicted, recollecting his own impure deeds.

Please find the audio recording of this verse below. Please take the time to recite the following three times before reading the words of Lord Buddha:

Namo Tassa Bhagavato Arahato Sammā Sambudhassa (3 times).

Homage to the blessed One, the Perfected One, the Fully Awakened One (3 times).

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1qbWH5SCXE2ypMFqCBhz34WEkPEGjEl2b/view?usp=sharing

Be sure to repeat the verse, with the verse number at least ten times out loud. It helps if you can do this multiple times a day and use as many different techniques (writing, repetition, listening) as possible.

The Illustrated Dhammapada, Treasury of Truth, gives the following context and explanation for this verse of the Dhammapada:

Verse 15. Sorrow Springs From Evil Deeds

Here one grieves, one grieves hereafter,
in both ways does the evil-doer grieve;
one grieves and is afflicted,
one’s own base kammas seeing.

Explanation: People who commit evil actions are unaware of their consequences at the moment of performance. Therefore, they tend to repent on seeing the consequences of what they did. This creates grief. This does not mean that one must always suffer the consequences of one’s deeds, without any hope. If that is the case, there is no benefit in leading a religious life, nor is there any opportunity to work for one’s emancipation.

Posted by: Upāsaka Subhavi | 03/01/2021

Dhammapada Memorization: Verse 14

14. Just as rain does not break through a well-thatched house, so passion never penetrates a well-developed mind.

Please find the audio recording of this verse below. Please take the time to recite the following three times before reading the words of Lord Buddha:

Namo Tassa Bhagavato Arahato Sammā Sambudhassa (3 times).

Homage to the blessed One, the Perfected One, the Fully Awakened One (3 times).

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1qbWH5SCXE2ypMFqCBhz34WEkPEGjEl2b/view?usp=sharing

Be sure to repeat the verse, with the verse number at least ten times out loud. It helps if you can do this multiple times a day and use as many different techniques (writing, repetition, listening) as possible.

The Illustrated Dhammapada, Treasury of Truth, gives the following context and explanation for this verse of the Dhammapada:

Verse 14. The Disciplined Mind Keeps Lust Away

As rain does never penetrate
a house that is well-thatched,
so lust does never penetrate
the mind well cultivated.

Explanation: When the house is well protected by a well-thatched roof, it is not harmed by the rain, because rain-water cannot seep though it. In the same way, the well-cultured temperament too does not allow passion to come through. Therefore, the well-cultured temperament cannot be penetrated by passions.

Posted by: Upāsaka Subhavi | 03/01/2021

Dhammapada Memorization: Verse 13

13. Just as rain breaks through an ill-thatched house, so passion penetrates an undeveloped mind.

Please find the audio recording of this verse below. Please take the time to recite the following three times before reading the words of Lord Buddha:

Namo Tassa Bhagavato Arahato Sammā Sambudhassa (3 times).

Homage to the blessed One, the Perfected One, the Fully Awakened One (3 times).

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1qbWH5SCXE2ypMFqCBhz34WEkPEGjEl2b/view?usp=sharing

Be sure to repeat the verse, with the verse number at least ten times out loud. It helps if you can do this multiple times a day and use as many different techniques (writing, repetition, listening) as possible.

The Illustrated Dhammapada, Treasury of Truth, gives the following context and explanation for this verse of the Dhammapada:

Verse 13. Lust Penetrates Untrained Mind

Even as the rain does penetrate
a house that’s badly thatched,
likewise lust does penetrate
the mind uncultivated.

Explanation: It is quite necessary that a house should have a well-thatched roof. If the thatching is weak, rain seeps through the house. Just as a badly thatched roof lets in the rain, the uncultured temperament too is open to passions. The temperament that is not cultured is penetrated easily by lust.

From the Barre Center for Buddhist Studies:

The notion of developing the mind lies at the heart of the Buddhist tradition. Development (literally “causing to be”) has to do with strengthening the ability to focus, to stabilize, and to direct the mind, rather than allowing it to be carried off by whatever breezes waft in upon it from the senses or from its own unconscious. The question is whether your mind controls you or you control your mind. If your intention is to keep your attention on the breath, but it wanders off at the slightest provocation, then your ability to focus the mind is undeveloped. Yet remaining focused on a chosen object is a skill that can be learned, like any other, by practice, patient repetition, and gradual development.

Commentary:

In this case the skill developed is the ability to resist or deflect the influence of passion (raga), a word used more or less synonymously with desire, craving, attachment, etc. and thus the core cause of suffering. The effectiveness of a well-thatched roof (as they all were in those days) lies in its ability to deflect moisture and protect the contents of the house from getting soaked. By analogy, a well-developed mind will be aware of an unwholesome emotion that has arisen, for example, or a provocative sense input, but will allow these to roll off the mind and not penetrate into ensuing mind moments to drench the mind with clinging. A similar image often used in early Buddhist literature is of water rolling off a lotus leaf or the feathers of a duck.

When mindfulness of the body is well developed, conceptual thoughts will not penetrate; when loving kindness is well developed, aversion will not penetrate; when insight is well developed, ignorance and confusion will not penetrate. In short, when the mind is well developed, all its functions will be well shielded from the intrusion of suffering.

From: https://www.buddhistinquiry.org/article/dhammapada-13/

Memorize By Heart app: https://memorizebyheart.app/

Posted by: Upāsaka Subhavi | 02/27/2021

Upāsaka Subhavi

I was blessed to have a formal Pali name given to me today in a commitment ceremony. Even better, today is the auspicious observance of Magha Puja.

Posted by: Upāsaka Subhavi | 02/27/2021

Dhammapada Memorization: Verse 12

12. Those who know the essential to be essential and the unessential to be unessential, dwelling in right thoughts, do arrive at the essential.

Please find the audio recording of this verse below. Please take the time to recite the following three times before reading the words of Lord Buddha:

Namo Tassa Bhagavato Arahato Sammā Sambudhassa (3 times).

Homage to the blessed One, the Perfected One, the Fully Awakened One (3 times).

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1qbWH5SCXE2ypMFqCBhz34WEkPEGjEl2b/view?usp=sharing

Be sure to repeat the verse, with the verse number at least ten times out loud. It helps if you can do this multiple times a day and use as many different techniques (writing, repetition, listening) as possible.

The Illustrated Dhammapada, Treasury of Truth, gives the following context and explanation for this verse of the Dhammapada:

12. Truth Enlightens

That which is real they know as real,
that unreal, to be unreal;
roaming fields of thought well-formed
they at the real arrive.

Explanation: The wise person who is able to recognize the true values leading to spiritual attainment, is capable of attaining to spiritual heights. Such a person is possessed of right views.

Memorize By Heart app: https://memorizebyheart.app/

Posted by: Upāsaka Subhavi | 02/26/2021

Dhammapada Memorization: Verse 11

11. Those who mistake the unessential to be essential and the essential to be unessential, dwelling in wrong thoughts, never arrive at the essential.

Please find the audio recording of this verse below. Please take the time to recite the following three times before reading the words of Lord Buddha:

Namo Tassa Bhagavato Arahato Sammā Sambudhassa (3 times).

Homage to the blessed One, the Perfected One, the Fully Awakened One (3 times).

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1qbWH5SCXE2ypMFqCBhz34WEkPEGjEl2b/view?usp=sharing

Be sure to repeat the verse, with the verse number at least ten times out loud. It helps if you can do this multiple times a day and use as many different techniques (writing, repetition, listening) as possible.

The Illustrated Dhammapada, Treasury of Truth, gives the following context and explanation for this verse of the Dhammapada:

Verse 11. False Values Bar Spiritual Progress

Conceiving the real in unreality
while seeing unreal the truly real,
roaming fields of thoughts ill-formed:
never they at the real arrive.

Explanation: A person interested in spiritual progress must be aware of spiritual values. It is true that material things are also necessary. But they are not the values to be sought after for spiritual progress. If people were to give prominence to material values they cannot attain any spiritual heights.

Memorize By Heart app: https://memorizebyheart.app/

Posted by: Upāsaka Subhavi | 02/25/2021

Dhammapada Memorization: Verse 10

10. But whoever is purged of depravity, well-established in virtues and filled with self-control and truthfulness, he indeed is worthy of the yellow robe.

Please find the audio recording of this verse below. Please take the time to recite the following three times before reading the words of Lord Buddha:

Namo Tassa Bhagavato Arahato Sammā Sambudhassa (3 times).

Homage to the blessed One, the Perfected One, the Fully Awakened One (3 times).

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1qbWH5SCXE2ypMFqCBhz34WEkPEGjEl2b/view?usp=sharing

Be sure to repeat the verse, with the verse number at least ten times out loud. It helps if you can do this multiple times a day and use as many different techniques (writing, repetition, listening) as possible.

The Illustrated Dhammapada, Treasury of Truth, gives the following context and explanation for the ninth verse of the Dhammapada:

Verse 10. The Virtuous Deserve the Stained Robe

But one who is self-cleansed of stain,
in moral conduct firmly set,
having restraint and truthfulness
is fit for the stainless robe.

Explanation: Whoever dons the ‘stained cloth’, being free of defilements, who is well conducted and tranquil within, having emotions under control and aware of reality, such a person is worthy of the sacred ‘stained cloth’.

Memorize By Heart app: https://memorizebyheart.app/

Posted by: Upāsaka Subhavi | 02/24/2021

Dhammapada Memorization: Verse 9

9. Whoever being depraved, devoid of self-control and truthfulness, should don the monk’s yellow robe, he surely is not worthy of the robe.

Please find the audio recording of this verse below. Please take the time to recite the following three times before reading the words of Lord Buddha:

Namo Tassa Bhagavato Arahato Sammā Sambudhassa (3 times).

Homage to the blessed One, the Perfected One, the Fully Awakened One (3 times).

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1qbWH5SCXE2ypMFqCBhz34WEkPEGjEl2b/view?usp=sharing

Be sure to repeat the verse, with the verse number at least ten times out loud. It helps if you can do this multiple times a day and use as many different techniques (writing, repetition, listening) as possible.

The Illustrated Dhammapada, Treasury of Truth, gives the following context and explanation for the ninth verse of the Dhammapada:

Verse 9. Those Who Do Not Deserve the Stained Robe

One who wears the stainless robe
who’s yet not free from stain,
without restraint and truthfulness
for the stainless robe’s unfit.

Explanation: A monk may be stained by defilements, bereft of self-control and awareness of reality. Such a monk, though he may wear the ‘stained cloth’ ( the monk’s robe which has been specially coloured with dye obtained from wild plants), he is not worthy of such a saintly garb.

Memorize By Heart app: https://memorizebyheart.app/

Older Posts »

Categories

DiosRaw

LOVE IS THE ANSWER

Daily Dhamma Study Group

Teachings of Lord Buddha in the Pali Canon