Posted by: Upāsaka | 10/31/2017

Gratitude as Metta

There are certain people who never seem to appreciate what you do for them. And, when ones practice is weak, it can be all too easy to fall into the trap of resentment – at least I know I have innumerable times in the past. Reflecting on how crappy it can feel to have one’s efforts completely ignored or, worse, discredited and downplayed I realized that this is not something I would wish upon any other. This realization was a kind of a turning point for me in terms of how I vote gratitude and appreciation.

You see, I have always seen gratitude as a good thing but something which is probably for the benefit of the one expressing it. Mostly, I have viewed gratitude as its expression as a sign of refined manners and good behavior. Only now do I see it as an expressing of metta and karuna.

When we thank someone for even the most seemingly insignificant thing we’re taking the time to recognize their effort and its attendant suffering. When we thank them we’re letting them know that they are heard, seen and cared for age that whatever they do really does matter. When we give thanks we also transform whatever they have done into the basis for merit and brighten both our mind and theirs.

As such, I intend to make it a practice to thank each person I speak with in a day at least once. May we all find freedom from suffering and thank you for reading.


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