Posted by: Upāsaka | 03/24/2016

Not Me, Not Mine

334. The Lord said to the monks: “Body is not self. If it were the self, it would not be liable to affliction, and one could say: ‘Let my body be like this. Let my body not be like this.’ But since the body is not the self, it is liable to affliction, and one cannot say: ‘Let my body be like this. Let my body not be like this.’ And it is the same with feeling, perception, mental constructs and consciousness. What do you think? Is body permanent or impermanent?”
“Impermanent, sir.”
“Now, is what is impermanent painful or pleasant?”
“Painful, sir.”
“Now, is it fit to regard what is impermanent and painful like this: ‘This is mine, this is I, this is my self?”
“No, sir.”
“And it is the same with feeling, perception, mental constructs and consciousness. So, any kind of body, feeling, perception, mental constructs or consciousness – whether past, present or future, whether gross or subtle, whether internal or external, whether inferior or superior, whether far or near – must with right understanding be regarded thus: ‘This is not mine, this is not I, this is not myself.’ When a noble disciple has heard this and sees this, he is detached from body, feeling, perception, mental constructs and consciousness. Being detached, passions fade, with the fading of passions he is free, and when he is free he knows he is free. He knows: ‘Birth is ended, the holy life has been lived, what has had to be done is done, there is no more of this.’ ”

Samyutta Nikaya III.67

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