Posted by: Upāsaka Subhavi | 12/27/2012

Ingratitude

English: Allah in stone in Rohtas Fort, Distri...

In Islam those who don’t believe in Allah are called kafirun which, I have read, means not solely those without faith but those who are ungrateful as well. Obviously such an idea can only be stretched so much when speaking of the Dhamma but the sentiment which underlies the concept is what fascinates me. In the spirit of my resolve not to complain it seems quite apropos to spend some time thinking about the meaning of contentment, gratitude and their opposites.

What does it mean to be ungrateful for the conditions in which we find ourselves? Surely it doesn’t amount to the depths of sin to which ingratitude and disbelief would for a Muslim but there is still something to it isn’t there? To me it seems that the idea of a kafir as someone who is ungrateful belies an understanding of the separation between ourselves and the wholesomeness of contentment. Yeah, it’s nothing so nearly as grandiose as separation from the Almighty but I feel it speaks to something similar. Then again, it is early and I could be completely missing the mark.

May I seek to be grateful for my blessing and cultivate contentment here and now.

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